DNDi aims to deliver:

  • A safe, effective, and easy-to-use direct-acting antiviral regimen, to be used as an affordable combination paving the way for a public health approach to hepatitis C.
  • Increased access to affordable treatments by supporting policy change and encouraging political will to treat hepatitis C.
  • Innovative programmes to improve access to hepatitis C diagnosis and treatment in a variety of countries.

DNDi’s current hepatitis C portfolio includes:

R&D development stage iconDevelopment

  • Ravidasvir + sofosbuvir: With the aim of enrolling 300 patients infected with genotypes 1a, 1b, 2, 3, and 6 – both with and without cirrhosis – the second stage of the trial was launched in late 2018, with the first patients enrolled in Malaysia in January 2019 and in Thailand in May 2019.As of January 2020, 180 patients had been enrolled, of whom 46 were in Thailand and 134 in Malaysia.

    Plans to submit for the conditional registration of ravidasvir with the Malaysian National Pharmaceutical Regulatory Authority are underway and filing is expected in mid-2020.

R&D implementation stage icon Implementation

  • Hepatitis C screening in Malaysia – #MYmissingmillions: Ahead of World Hepatitis Day 2019, the Malaysian Ministry of Health, DNDi, and FIND launched the #MYmissingmillions campaign to raise awareness of the importance of early hepatitis C diagnosis and treatment. The partnership offered Malaysians, especially those considered to be at high risk, the opportunity to be screened at more than 100 hospitals, primary healthcare centres, and study sites located across the country’s 14 states, and to receive highly effective treatment free of charge.More than 11,000 patients were screened over the course of 2019, with over 400 people linked to hepatitis C treatment in government hospitals and 23 as part of the DNDi clinical trial.

Photo credit: Suriyan Tanasri-DNDi

Click here to read the article

The non-profit research and development organization Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) is pleased to announce a contribution of USD 2.2 million (9.2 million Malaysian Ringgit) from Malaysian pharmaceutical company, Pharmaniaga, to support the registration of a new treatment combination for people living with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Malaysia.

The contribution by Pharmaniaga will support the registration of a new combination therapy using ravidasvir, which is being evaluated in combination with sofosbuvir in clinical trials in Malaysia co-sponsored by DNDi and the Malaysian Ministry of Health.

‘This support from Pharmaniaga will support the delivery of a new direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C. It will increase treatment options and facilitate access to medicines and the fruits of innovation in countries where the price of HCV is still a barrier,’ said Jean-Michel Piedagnel, Director of DNDi, South-East Asia.  

HCV is a silent epidemic, as the huge majority of those infected are not aware of their status, show no symptoms of the disease, and therefore do not seek treatment. In recent years, drug prices have fallen considerably, but not enough for countries to roll out treatment widely or test-and-treat strategies that could lead towards elimination of the disease as a public health problem.

An estimated 400,000 people are living with hepatitis C in Malaysia. The Government of Malaysia has committed to providing HCV screening, diagnosis and treatment free of charge through the public health system. The Ministry of Health, in collaboration with the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) and DNDi, is actively decentralizing hepatitis C treatment in order to scale up its efforts to treat more patients.

‘We see this contribution as affirmative action where we continue to work together to prevent, test, and treat hepatitis C. Pharmaniaga remains optimistic that as a nation, we will succeed in eliminating hepatitis C in Malaysia by 2030. We are also committed to finding the #missingmillions and providing cheaper alternative to treatment,’ said Dato’ Farshila Emran, Managing Director of Pharmaniaga.

DNDi and its industrial partners will pursue registration of ravidasvir in Malaysia in 2020.

About hepatitis C

HCV is one of the world’s most common infectious diseases, usually contracted through unsafe healthcare and injection drug use. Globally, more than 71 million people are chronically infected, over 80% of whom live in low- and middle-income countries – but only one in five people know they have the disease. Around 400,000 people die every year, and the mortality rate is increasing, making it a global health priority: the World Health Organization (WHO) has set an ambitious target of viral hepatitis elimination by 2030. In Malaysia, HCV disease burden is high and predicted to rise steeply over the coming decades, leading to a projected 63,900 HCV-related deaths by 2039.

About DNDi

The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) is a not-for-profit R&D organization working to deliver new treatments for neglected patients, in particular for sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, filaria, mycetoma, paediatric HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis C virus (HCV). DNDi’s ambition is to enable access to HCV treatment, through the development and registration of affordable, safe, and efficacious pan-genotypic direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), and by supporting policy change and political will to remove barriers to access to DAAs globally. www.dndi.org

Media contact

DNDi South East Asia
Molly Jagpal
+60 (0)12 546 8362
mjagpal@dndi.org

DNDi Geneva
media@dndi.org

Photo credit: Kitjapat Natthapisut-DNDi

Washington DC, USA

Update 25 October 2019: PAHO has since communicated a price range of US$96-126 for SOF/DAC, depending on volumes.

Man talking with a doctor

The Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) has succeeded in reducing the price of expensive medicines that can cure people living with hepatitis C (HCV), according to an announcement made at its 57th Directing Council meeting. PAHO has negotiated prices of US$129 for 3 months of treatment from generic sources of sofosbuvir/daclatasvir. This significant move could enable national programmes to scale up diagnosis and treatment and eliminate HCV as a public health problem.

HCV affects about seven million people in the Americas, but the majority of those living with the disease are not diagnosed and have no access to treatment. Few countries have to date managed to secure broad access to affordable medicines.

This new price achieved by PAHO could help change the scenario for the countries where patent barriers don’t prevent them from purchasing generic sources,” said Michel Lotrowska, Director of DNDi Latin America. “With prices ranging from $1,230 to $4,500, the affordability barrier remains considerable for countries where HCV medicines are under patent, unless they take steps to overcome regulatory or intellectual property barriers.

DNDi supports PAHO’s decision to make these prices public, as transparency is an important factor in helping countries know about and obtain lower prices. DNDi calls on PAHO and its member states to continue to use all options to improve access to affordable treatments, including following the example of countries such as Malaysia, where the local authorities have issued a “government use” (compulsory) licence enabling access to generic versions of a patented medicine to treat the disease.

Photo credit: Vinicius Berger-DNDi

Click here to read the article

“The #MYmissingmillions campaign raises awareness about the importance of conducting early screening for hepatitis C”

Click here to read the article

The Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) are partnering with the Ministry of Health (MOH) in Malaysia to launch the country’s biggest-ever screening initiative for the hepatitis C virus (HCV).

The #MYmissingmillions campaign, announced ahead of World Hepatitis Day 2019, aims to raise awareness of the importance of early HCV diagnosis and to ensure that all Malaysians have the opportunity to be tested and receive highly effective treatment, for free. It is estimated that there are around 400,000 people living with hepatitis C in Malaysia. More than 71 million people worldwide are chronically infected, over 80% of whom live in low- and middle-income countries. It’s a silent epidemic, as the huge majority of those infected are not aware of their status, show no symptoms of the disease, and therefore do not seek treatment.

The partnership will offer Malaysians, especially those considered to be at high risk, the opportunity to be screened for free in July using a simple rapid diagnostic test at more than 100 hospitals, primary healthcare centres and FIND study sites located across the country’s 14 states. All patients confirmed as having active HCV (viremia) will be linked to care at local government healthcare facilities where direct-acting antiviral therapy is available.

The #MYmissingmillions campaign is part of the Malaysian MOH’s wider efforts to simplify and decentralize hepatitis C screening and treatment. The Malaysian national HCV programme, following an ambitious treatment strategy to overcome the prohibitively high cost of treatments in the country, offers free hepatitis C treatment (sofosbuvir/daclatasvir) in government hospitals.

DNDi and FIND hope that their support can further propel the government’s strategy to find the #MYmissingmillions.

About hepatitis C

HCV is one of the world’s most common infectious diseases, usually contracted through unsafe healthcare and injection drug use. Globally, more than 71 million people are chronically infected, over 80% of whom live in low- and middle-income countries – but only one in five people know they have the disease. Around 400,000 people die every year, and the mortality rate is increasing, making it a global health priority: the World Health Organization (WHO) has set an ambitious target of viral hepatitis elimination by 2030. In Malaysia, HCV disease burden is high and predicted to rise steeply over the coming decades, leading to a projected 63,900 HCV-related deaths by 2039. For further information, please visit www.dndi.org

About FIND

FIND is a global non-profit organization that drives innovation in the development and delivery of diagnostics to combat major diseases affecting the world’s poorest populations. Our work bridges R&D to access, overcoming scientific barriers to technology development; generating evidence for regulators and policy-makers; addressing market failures; and enabling accelerated uptake and access to diagnostics in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Since 2003, we have been instrumental in the delivery of 24 new diagnostic tools. Over 50 million FIND-supported products have been provided to 150 LMICs since the start of 2015. A WHO Collaborating Centre, we work with more than 200 academic, industry, governmental, and civil society partners worldwide, on over 70 active projects that cross six priority disease areas. FIND is committed to a future in which diagnostics underpin treatment decisions and provide the foundation for disease surveillance, control, and prevention. For further information, please visit www.finddx.org

About DNDi

The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) is a not-for-profit R&D organization working to deliver new treatments for neglected patients, in particular for sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, filaria, mycetoma, paediatric HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis C virus (HCV). DNDi’s ambition is to enable access to HCV treatment, through the development and registration of affordable, safe, and efficacious pan-genotypic direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), and by supporting policy change and political will to remove barriers to access to DAAs globally. www.dndi.org

Media contact

DNDi South East Asia: Molly Jagpal
+60 (0)12 546 8362
mjagpal@dndi.org

DNDi Geneva:
media@dndi.org

FIND: Sarah-Jane Loveday, Head of Communications
+41 (0) 22 710 27 88
+41 (0) 79 431 62 44
media@finddx.org

กัวลาลัมเปอร์ – 17 กรกฎาคม 2562

สนับสนุนโดยองค์กรยารักษาโรคที่ถูกละเลยและมูลนิธิเพื่อการวินิจฉัยเชิงนวัตกรรมใหม่ การรณรงค์เพื่อค้นหา “ผู้สูญหายนับล้าน” สำหรับภัยเงียบจากโรคที่รักษาได้

มูลนิธิเพื่อการวินิจฉัยเชิงนวัตกรรมใหม่ (The Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics -FIND) และองค์กรยาเพื่อรักษาโรคที่ถูกละเลย (Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative – DNDi) ร่วมกับกระทรวงสาธารณสุขประเทศมาเลเซีย (MOH) เพื่อเปิดตัวโครงการคัดกรองไวรัสตับอักเสบซี (HCV) ที่ใหญ่ที่สุดในประเทศ

การรณรงค์ #MYmissingmillions ที่ประกาศในวันไวรัสตับอักเสบโลกปี  2562 มีเป้าหมายเพื่อเพิ่มความตระหนักถึงความสำคัญของการวินิจฉัยโรคไวรัสตับอักเสบซีโดยเร็ว และเพื่อให้แน่ใจว่าชาวมาเลเซียทุกคนมีโอกาสได้รับการตรวจและการรักษาที่มีประสิทธิภาพสูงฟรี ซึ่งคาดการณ์ว่าจะมีผู้ที่เป็นโรคไวรัสตับอักเสบซีประมาณ 400,000 คนอยู่ในมาเลเซีย มีจำนวนผู้ที่ติดเชื้อเรื้อรังมากกว่า 71 ล้านคนทั่วโลกซึ่ง 80% เป็นผู้ที่อาศัยอยู่ในประเทศที่มีรายได้ต่ำและปานกลาง (LMICs) ไวรัสตับอักเสบซีเป็นภัยเงียบเนื่องจากคนส่วนใหญ่ที่ติดเชื้อไม่ทราบสถานะของตนเองและไม่มีการแสดงอาการของโรคจึงไม่รับการรักษา

ความร่วมมือดังกล่าวจะช่วยให้ชาวมาเลเซียโดยเฉพาะผู้ที่มีความเสี่ยงสูงมีโอกาสได้รับการตรวจคัดกรองฟรีในเดือนกรกฎาคม โดยใช้การตรวจสอบวินิจฉัยอย่างรวดเร็วและง่ายที่โรงพยาบาลกว่า 100 แห่ง ศูนย์สุขภาพหลัก และศูนย์วิจัย FIND ซึ่งตั้งอยู่ใน 14 รัฐทั่วประเทศ ผู้ป่วยทั้งหมดที่ได้รับการยืนยันว่ามีไวรัสตับอักเสบซี (viremia) จะได้รับการประสานเพื่อดูแลที่สถานพยาบาลท้องถิ่นของรัฐที่มีการรักษาด้วยยาต้านไวรัสที่ออกฤทธิ์โดยตรง

การรณรงค์ #MYmissingmillions เป็นส่วนหนึ่งของความพยายามของกระทรวงสาธารณสุขมาเลเซีย (MOH) เพื่อลดความซับซ้อนและกระจายการตรวจคัดกรองและรักษาโรคไวรัสตับอักเสบซี โครงการไวรัสตับอักเสบซี (HCV) แห่งชาติของมาเลเซีย ดำเนินการตามกลยุทธ์การรักษาเพื่อรับมือกับต้นทุนการรักษาที่สูงในประเทศ โดยให้การรักษาโรคไวรัสตับอักเสบซีฟรี (sofosbuvir/daclatasvir) ในโรงพยาบาลของรัฐ

DNDi และ FIND หวังว่าการสนับสนุนดังกล่าวสามารถขับเคลื่อนกลยุทธ์ของรัฐเพื่อค้นหากลุ่ม #MYmissingmillions

เกี่ยวกับไวรัสตับอักเสบซี

ไวรัสตับอักเสบซีเป็นหนึ่งในโรคติดเชื้อที่พบได้บ่อยที่สุดในโลก ซึ่งติดต่อผ่านการดูแลสุขภาพที่ไม่ปลอดภัยและการใช้ยาเสพติดแบบฉีด มีผู้ติดเชื้อเรื้อรังมากกว่า 71 ล้านคนทั่วโลก โดยมากกว่า 80% เป็นผู้ที่อาศัยอยู่ในประเทศที่มีรายได้ต่ำและปานกลาง (LMICs) – มีเพียงหนึ่งในห้าคนเท่านั้นรู้ว่าพวกเขามีโรคนี้อยู่ ทุกๆ ปีจะมีผู้ที่เสียชีวิตจากโรคนี้ประมาณ 400,000 คน และอัตราการเสียชีวิตมีแนวโน้มเพิ่มขึ้น จึงทำให้เป็นสิ่งสำคัญต่อสุขภาพทั่วโลก: องค์การอนามัยโลก (WHO) ได้กำหนดเป้าหมายในการกำจัดไวรัสตับอักเสบภายในปี 2573 ภาระของโรคไวรัสตับอักเสบซีในประเทศมาเลเซียมีสูงและคาดว่าจะเพิ่มขึ้นอย่างมากในอีกหลายทศวรรษต่อจากนี้ ซึ่งจะนำไปสู่การเสียชีวิตของผู้ที่ติดเชื้อ HCV จำนวน 63,900 คนภายในปี 2582 สำหรับข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมกรุณาเยี่ยมชม www.dndi.org

เกี่ยวกับ FIND

FIND เป็นองค์กรระดับโลกที่ไม่แสวงผลกำไร ขับเคลื่อนนวัตกรรมในการพัฒนาและการส่งมอบการวินิจฉัยเพื่อต่อสู้กับโรคที่สำคัญที่ส่งผลกระทบต่อประชากรที่ยากจนที่สุดในโลก ภารกิจของเราเกี่ยวข้องกับการวิจัยและการพัฒนาเพื่อเข้าถึงการรับมือกับอุปสรรคทางวิทยาศาสตร์ต่อการพัฒนาเทคโนโลยี การสร้างหลักฐานข้อมูลสำหรับผู้กำกับดูแลและผู้กำหนดนโยบาย การจัดการกับความล้มเหลวของตลาด และการสนับสนุนความเข้าใจและการเข้าถึงการวินิจฉัยในประเทศที่มีรายได้ต่ำและปานกลาง (LMICs) เราได้ส่งมอบเครื่องมือใหม่สำหรับการวินิจฉัย 24 รายการตั้งแต่ปี 2546 ผลิตภัณฑ์กว่า 50 ล้านรายการที่สนับสนุนโดย FIND ถูกนำส่งให้แก่ประเทศมีรายได้ต่ำและปานกลาง 150 ประเทศตั้งแต่ต้นปี 2558 ในฐานะที่เป็นศูนย์ความร่วมมือองค์การอนามัยโลก เราทำงานร่วมกับพันธมิตรด้านวิชาการ อุตสาหกรรม ภาครัฐ และภาคประชาสังคมกว่า 200 องค์กรทั่วโลกในการจัดทำโครงการกว่า 70 โครงการที่เกี่ยวกับโรคที่สำคัญหกด้าน  FIND มีความมุ่งมั่นต่ออนาคตที่การวินิจฉัยสนับสนุนการตัดสินใจในการรักษาและเป็นรากฐานสำหรับการเฝ้าระวัง การควบคุม และการป้องกันโรค สำหรับข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมกรุณาเยี่ยมชม www.finddx.org

เกี่ยวกับ DNDi

องค์กรยารักษาโรคที่ไม่ได้รับความสนใจ (DNDi) เป็นองค์กรเพื่อการวิจัยและพัฒนาโดยไม่แสวงหาผลกำไร ดำเนินการส่งมอบการรักษาใหม่สำหรับผู้ป่วยโรคที่ถูกละเลยโดยเฉพาะอย่างยิ่งโรคที่เกี่ยวกับการนอนหลับ โรคชากาส โรคลิชมาเนีย โรคเท้าช้าง โรคฝีรั่ว เอชไอวี/เอดส์ในเด็ก ไวรัสตับอักเสบซี (HCV) ความมุ่งหมายของ DNDi คือการที่สามารถเข้าถึงการรักษาโรคตับอักเสบซี (HCV) ผ่านการพัฒนาและการขึ้นทะเบียนยาต้านไวรัสที่ออกฤทธิ์โดยตรง (DAA) ที่ปลอดภัยและมีประสิทธิภาพ  และสนับสนุนการเปลี่ยนแปลงนโยบายและเจตจำนงทางการเมืองเพื่อขจัดอุปสรรคในการเข้าถึงยาต้านไวรัสที่ออกฤทธิ์โดยตรง (DAAs) ทั่วโลก www.dndi.org

ข้อมูลติดต่อสื่อ

DNDi South East Asia: Molly Jagpal
+60 (0)12 546 8362
mjagpal@dndi.org

DNDi Geneva:
media@dndi.org

FIND: Sarah-Jane Loveday, Head of Communications
+41 (0) 22 710 27 88
+41 (0) 79 431 62 44
media@finddx.org

(吉隆坡17日讯)

在“被忽视疾病药物研发倡议组织”(DNDi)和创新诊断基金会(FIND)的支持下,该活动在为这种无声但可治愈的疾病寻找“遗漏的数百万人”

创新诊断基金会(FIND)和被忽视疾病药物倡议组织(DNDi)正与马来西亚卫生部(MOH)合作,推出我国有史以来规模最大的C型肝炎病毒筛查计划。

“大马遗漏的万人”(#MYmissingmillions)活动早于2019年世界肝炎日来临之前公布,旨在提高人们对C型肝炎病毒早期诊断的重要性的意识,并确保所有国人都有机会免费接受检测及接受高效治疗。据估计,马来西亚约有40万人患有C型肝炎;而全球则有超过7100万人长期感染,其中80%以上的患者来自低收入和中等收入国家。这是一种无声的流行病,因为绝大多数的感染者并不知道自己身体的状况,也没有表现出疾病的症状,因此不寻求治疗。

该合作计划于7月份在全国14个州的100多家医院、初级医疗中心和FIND研究中心进行简单的快速诊断测试,为所有马来西亚人,特别是那些被认为具有高风险的人提供免费的筛查机会。所有确诊带有活跃的C型肝炎病毒(病毒血症)的患者将与当地政府的医疗机构连结起来,以得到护理,这些机构可提供直接作用的抗病毒治疗。

“大马遗漏的万人”活动是马来西亚卫生部在为C型肝炎进行简化与分散筛查及治疗方面所作出的更广泛努力的一部分。马来西亚国家C型肝炎计划采取更加全面的治疗策略,以克服国内C型肝炎治疗成本过高的问题,并在政府医院提供免费的C型肝炎治疗(索非布韦/达卡他韦,sofosbuvir/daclatasvir)。

DNDi和FIND希望他们的支持能够进一步推动政府寻找“大马遗漏的万人”的战略措施。

关于C型肝炎

C型肝炎是世界上最常见的传染病之一,一般通过不安全的医疗操作和注射吸毒传染。全球有超过7100万人患有慢性感染,其中80%以上生活在中低收入国家,但只有五分之一的人知道他们患有这种疾病。每年约有40万人死亡,死亡率也正在上升,使其成为全球卫生优先关注的问题:世界卫生组织(WHO)制定了2030年全面消灭病毒性肝炎的目标。在马来西亚,C型肝炎疾病负担很高,预计未来几十年将急剧上升,预计到2039年将有6万3900例C型肝炎相关死亡病例。欲了解更多信息,请浏览 www.dndi.org

关于FIND

创新诊断基金会(Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics, 简称FIND)是一个全球性的非营利组织,致力于开发和提供创新诊断技术,以对抗影响世界贫困人口的主要疾病。我们的工作与研发衔接,力图突破、克服技术发展的科学障碍;为监管者和决策者提供证据;解决市场失灵问题;促使中低收入国家加快获得和受到诊断。自2003年开始,我们在提供24种新型诊断工具的过程中发挥了重要作用。自2015年初,我们已向中低收入国家提供了超过5000万件获得 FIND 资助的产品。作为世界卫生组织合作中心,我们与全球 200 多个学术、工业、政府和民间团体合作伙伴合作,跨越 6 个重点疾病领域,开展 70 多个有效项目。FIND 致力于实现“治疗依托诊断”这样的一个未来,为疾病监测、控制和预防提供基础。欲了解更多信息,请浏览www.finddx.org

关于 DNDi

“被忽视疾病药物研发倡议组织”(Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative,简称DNDi)是一个非营利研发组织,致力为被忽视的病人提供新治疗法,尤其是针对昏睡病(非洲人类锥虫病)、南美锥虫病、利什曼病、淋巴丝虫病、足分枝菌病、儿科爱滋病毒/爱滋病以及C型肝炎病毒患者。DNDi的目标是通过研发和注册一种廉价、安全且有效的泛基因型直接作用的抗病毒药品(DAAs),以及通过支持政策改革和政治意愿来消除全球各国在取得该抗病毒药品上的障碍,让大众更容易获得C型肝炎病毒治疗。 www.dndi.org

媒体联系人

DNDi 东南亚: Molly Jagpal
+60 (0)12 546 8362
mjagpal@dndi.org

FIND: 传播负责人Sarah-Jane Loveday
+41 (0) 22 710 27 88
+41 (0) 79 431 62 44
media@finddx.org

Kempen disokong oleh Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) dan Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND), bertujuan untuk mengesan pesakit yang menghidap HCV, iaitu sejenis penyakit yang senyap namun ianya boleh dirawat secara berkesan

Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics’ (FIND) danDrugs for Neglected Diseases initiative’ (DNDi) sedang bekerjasama dengan Kementerian Kesihatan Malaysia (KKM) bagi melancarkan inisiatif terbesar di seluruh negara dalam usaha penyaringan virus hepatitis C (HCV).

Kempen #MYmissingmillions yang telah diumumkan terlebih dahulu sebelum Hari Hepatitis Sedunia 2019 ini, bertujuan untuk meningkatkan kesedaran orang awam terhadap kepentingan diagnosis awal HCV dan bagi memastikan semua rakyat Malaysia berpeluang menjalani ujian saringan serta menerima rawatan berkesan secara percuma. Dianggarkan seramai 400,000 penduduk di Malaysia menghidapi hepatitis C. Lebih daripada 71 juta orang di seluruh dunia dijangkiti virus HCV ini, dan lebih 80% daripada mereka tinggal di negara-negara berpendapatan rendah dan sederhana (LMIC). Penyakit ini merupakan sejenis wabak senyap, kerana majoriti besar pesakit yang dijangkiti tidak menyedari keadaan mereka, serta tidak menunjukkan sebarang simptom atau gejala penyakit. Disebabkan ini, mereka tidak mendapatkan rawatan yang sepatutnya.

Kerjasama ini menawarkan peluang kepada rakyat Malaysia, terutamanya mereka yang dianggap berisiko tinggi, untuk menjalani ujian saringan percuma ini dalam bulan Julai 2019. Ujian saringan ini akan menggunakan sejenis kit diagnostik pantas yang boleh didapati di lebih daripada 100 buah hospital, klinik kesihatan dan tapak kajian FIND di kesemua 14 negeri seluruh negara. Semua pesakit yang disahkan menghidap jangkitan HCV aktif (viremia) akan dirujuk ke fasiliti kesihatan KKM terdekat, yang menawarkan rawatan antiviral, DAA (direct-acting antiviral).

Kempen #MYmissingmillions ini adalah sebahagian daripada usaha KKM untuk memperluaskan dan mempermudahkan proses saringan dan rawatan hepatitis C. Seiring dengan strategi rawatan yang bertujuan untuk menangani kos rawatan HCV dalam negara yang amat tinggi. Program HCV Kebangsaan kini menyediakan rawatan (sofosbuvir/daclatasvir) hepatitis C secara percuma di hospital-hospital kerajaan.

DNDi dan FIND berharap agar sokongan mereka dapat membantu mendorong strategi Kerajaan bagi mengesan pesakit-pesakit #MYmissingmillions ini.

About hepatitis C

HCV is one of the world’s most common infectious diseases, usually contracted through unsafe healthcare and injection drug use. Globally, more than 71 million people are chronically infected, over 80% of whom live in low- and middle-income countries – but only one in five people know they have the disease. Around 400,000 people die every year, and the mortality rate is increasing, making it a global health priority: the World Health Organization (WHO) has set an ambitious target of viral hepatitis elimination by 2030. In Malaysia, HCV disease burden is high and predicted to rise steeply over the coming decades, leading to a projected 63,900 HCV-related deaths by 2039. For further information, please visit www.dndi.org

About FIND

FIND is a global non-profit organization that drives innovation in the development and delivery of diagnostics to combat major diseases affecting the world’s poorest populations. Our work bridges R&D to access, overcoming scientific barriers to technology development; generating evidence for regulators and policy-makers; addressing market failures; and enabling accelerated uptake and access to diagnostics in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Since 2003, we have been instrumental in the delivery of 24 new diagnostic tools. Over 50 million FIND-supported products have been provided to 150 LMICs since the start of 2015. A WHO Collaborating Centre, we work with more than 200 academic, industry, governmental, and civil society partners worldwide, on over 70 active projects that cross six priority disease areas. FIND is committed to a future in which diagnostics underpin treatment decisions and provide the foundation for disease surveillance, control, and prevention. For further information, please visit www.finddx.org

About DNDi

The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) is a not-for-profit R&D organization working to deliver new treatments for neglected patients, in particular for sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, filaria, mycetoma, paediatric HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis C virus (HCV). DNDi’s ambition is to enable access to HCV treatment, through the development and registration of affordable, safe, and efficacious pan-genotypic direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), and by supporting policy change and political will to remove barriers to access to DAAs globally. www.dndi.org

Media contact

DNDi South East Asia: Molly Jagpal
+60 (0)12 546 8362
mjagpal@dndi.org

FIND: Sarah-Jane Loveday, Head of Communications
+41 (0) 22 710 27 88
+41 (0) 79 431 62 44
media@finddx.org